University where Chris Whitty studied will 'decolonise' curriculum

University where Chris Whitty studied will 'decolonise' curriculum

July 11, 2021

University where Chris Whitty studied reworks curriculum to make it ‘anti-racist’ after saying field of public health is guilty of upholding ‘white supremacy’ and ‘colonialism’

  • London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine said it will ‘decolonise’ courses
  • The university produced guidance for its staff on how to address colonial legacy
  • Teaching materials and reading lists will be revised to ‘de-privilege’ white men 

 The University where Chris Whitty studied is set to rework its curriculum to make it ‘anti-racist’ after determining the field of public health upholds ‘white supremacy’ and ‘colonialism’.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine has said it will ‘decolonise’ its courses and teaching to address ‘colonialism and racial discrimination’.

According to the Sunday Telegraph, the university has produced guidance for its staff warning that their graduates could spread colonial ideas in the field of public health which it says allegedly upholds ‘white supremacy’.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, where Chris Whitty (pictured) studied, said it will ‘decolonise’ its curriculum because field of public health ‘upholds white supremacy’

Staff have been advised to ‘de-privilege white European and North American men’ and the university is reviewing all its teaching material and reading lists, the Telegraph reports.

Prof Kara Hanson, leading decolonising work at the LSHTM, told The Sunday Telegraph: ‘We are making significant progress to ensure our learning materials are inclusive and do not include racist or colonial perspectives and language.’ 

Earlier this year, the university set up a Decolonising Global Heath work group which set out challenges faced by the field they felt needed addressing.

It said: ‘Colonial legacies shape the geopolitics of global health and work their way into programme and research design, implementation and monitoring.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine said it is working to make its learning material ‘more inclusive’ and to ensure they don’t include ‘colonial perspectives and language’

‘They also impact on career progression and student awards and shape global health as a political and scientific field.’

It said that action for race equality and decolonisation is needed because ‘racial and national hierarchies exist in our daily lives, our institutions and society at large’.

The university, which has offered guidance to the Government during the pandemic, established a panel of 17 students, staff and alumni to ‘address the prevalence and perpetuation of colonial power dynamics in global health’. 

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