Swiss doctors ask people to sign 'do not resuscitate' orders

Swiss doctors ask people to sign 'do not resuscitate' orders

November 23, 2020

Doctors ask people vulnerable to covid to sign ‘do not resuscitate’ orders to ease pressure on Swiss intensive care units

  • Doctors in Switzerland have called for people to sign ‘do not resuscitate’ orders
  • Those affected include people over 60 and those with heart disease, diabetes 
  •  Coronavirus infections rose by 9,751 since Friday, data on Monday showed 

Doctors in Switzerland have called for people who are vulnerable to coronavirus complications to sign ‘do not resuscitate orders’. 

The move is part of efforts to ease pressure on Swiss intensive care units.

The measure includes people who are over 60 and those with heart disease or diabetes. 

Such groups are being asked to sign end-of-life ‘do not resuscitate’ directions to ease pressure on intensive care units. 

An organisation for the elderly called Pro Senectute Schweiz said that the doctors’ appeal was excessive.  

Doctors in Switzerland have called for people who are vulnerable to coronavirus complications to sign ‘do not resuscitate orders’. Above, pedestrians, wearing protective face masks, walking in the street during a semi-lockdown in Geneva

Coronavirus infections rose by 9,751 since Friday, data from Swiss health authorities showed on Monday.

The total number of confirmed cases in Switzerland and neighbouring principality Liechtenstein increased to 300,352. 

The death toll rose by 213 to 3,788, while 410 new hospitalisations kept pressure on the health care system.

One of the country’s leading medical associations has warned that intensive care units are almost at full capacity, 

The Swiss Society for Intensive Care Medicine has warned the system is dangerously saturated. 

Speaking to Euronews, the society’s former President, Professor Thierry Fumeaux said: ‘What we call certified beds – visited by certificate commissioners – are all full, but of course we have some in reserve because all hospitals have been able to increase capacity by asking more people from their teams not normally in ICU to work there, but nevertheless the situation is critical.’ 

The total number of confirmed cases in Switzerland and neighbouring principality Liechtenstein increased to 300,352. Above, people wear masks as they walk the streets during lockdown in Geneva 

Switzerland’s modest coronavirus restrictions have allowed for near-normal operations at Alpine resorts. 

France, Italy, Austria and Germany have all ordered even the high-altitude lifts that could be running this early in the winter to remain closed for now in the hope that all resorts can benefit at peak-season, if and when the infection rate slows.

Switzerland, despite being a second-wave coronavirus hotspot with 5,000 infections a day and mounting deaths, is hoping that a middle way of social distancing, limits on gatherings and mask-wearing on lifts can prop up pillars of the economy such as tourism without fuelling the pandemic.

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