Putin says he offered to SELL hypersonic missiles to America

Putin says he offered to SELL hypersonic missiles to America

September 5, 2019

Vladimir Putin says he offered to SELL hypersonic missiles to America and claims: ‘I told Donald it will balance everything out’

  • Putin said he offered the Kremlin’s weapons to Trump at the G20 summit in June 
  • But the U.S. said it was already well on its way to manufacturing such weapons 
  • Putin said he was ‘ready for a dialogue’ to prevent a spiralling arms race

Vladimir Putin offered to sell Moscow’s most advanced hypersonic missiles to the United States, the Russian President has said. 

Putin said he wanted to ‘balance everything out’ by offering the Kremlin’s weapons to President Donald Trump at the G20 summit in June. 

However, the Americans rebuffed him and said they were already well on their way to manufacturing such weapons, Putin said. 

‘I told Donald the following: if you want, we can sell you some and this way we will balance everything out. But truth be told, they are saying that they will soon produce it themselves,’ the Russian leader said. 

‘Perhaps they will, but why waste money when we already have spent some and can get something back, and at the same time not harm our security but rather create a situation where there is a balance.’ 

Putin said he was ‘ready for a dialogue’ to prevent a spiralling arms race after Washington pulled out of a Cold War-era treaty, Russia’s TASS news agency reported. 

Vladimir Putin (pictured today at a conference in Russia) offered to sell Moscow’s most advanced hypersonic missiles to the United States, the Russian President has said

Claiming Russian superiority, Putin said that ‘so far not a single country in the world possesses these weapons, not even the U.S.’ 

The Kremlin strongman has frequently boasted about Moscow’s hypersonic missiles, saying after a test last year that they were ‘impossible to intercept’. 

Fears of a Cold War-style arms race have grown after the U.S. formally withdrew from the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces treaty last month, a move it had been signalling since last year.  

The 1987 pact signed by Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev had banned ground-launched weapons with ranges between 300 and 3,400 miles.

But Washington accused Moscow of violating the treaty and producing illegal missiles.  

Last month the U.S. tested a modified ground-launched version of a U.S. Navy Tomahawk cruise missile, which would have been banned under the treaty. 

Putin urged his own defence chiefs to ‘take comprehensive measures to prepare a symmetrical answer’.  

Putin said he offered to ‘balance everything out’ by offering the Kremlin’s weapons to President Donald Trump (pictured in Washington yesterday) at the G20 summit in June

European leaders have voiced fears over the consequences of the treaty’s demise, amid concerns of an arms race not seen since the Cold War. 

However NATO said in a statement in February the U.S. allies ‘fully support’ the withdrawal and agreed that Russia’s 9M729 missile violated the pact.  

It also comes amid rising doubts about whether the two countries will extend an agreement on long-range nuclear weapons scheduled to expire in 2021. 

Relations between Trump and Putin have gone back and forth, with Trump most recently voicing his support for Russia’s return to the G7. 

Russia was thrown out of what was then the G8 after its annexation of part of Ukraine in 2014 but Trump hinted he would invite Putin to the next summit, which he will be hosting in 2020.  

Vice President Mike Pence was forced to reassure the Ukrainian government that the U.S. ‘stood strongly for the territorial integrity of Ukraine’. 

Trump has long faced suspicion at home over his links to Putin and perhaps the most notorious moment of their relationship was the 2018 Helsinki summit at which Trump backed up Putin’s denials of meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

The U.S. President said ‘I don’t see any reason why it would be’ Russia, contradicting the findings of his own intelligence services and sparking a wave of condemnation at home. 

Relations between Trump and Putin (pictured together in Helsinki last year) have gone back and forth, with Trump most recently voicing his support for Russia’s return to the G7 

The two leaders have found themselves at odds on other geopolitical crises including Venezuela and Iran.  

Russia is an ally of Iran and Middle East tensions have ratcheted up in recent weeks after a series of threats to Gulf shipping. 

The U.S. blamed Iran for explosions on Western ships but Russia backed up Tehran’s denials of involvement. 

In Venezuela, the Trump administration recognised opposition leader Juan Guaido as the country’s interim leader at the height of the crisis earlier this year. 

However, Russia remained firmly behind Venezuela’s socialist leader Nicolas Maduro, who has clung to power with the help of the military. 

Trump also joined his Western allies in slapping sanctions on Russia over the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal in Britain in 2018. 

The UK government accused Russia of organising the poison plot but Moscow has denied involvement.  

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