PM's ally Lord Hogan-Howe decides not to re-apply for top job at NCA

PM's ally Lord Hogan-Howe decides not to re-apply for top job at NCA

July 30, 2022

Boris Johnson’s ally Lord Hogan-Howe decides not to re-apply for top job at National Crime Agency

  • Lord Hogan-Howe presided over the disastrous Operation Midland investigation
  • He was at centre of bitter cronyism row when recruitment process was reopened
  • Sources say Downing Street intervened to allow PM ally another crack at the role

Boris Johnson’s preferred choice for the National Crime Agency top job, Lord Hogan-Howe, has dropped out of the race after deciding not to re-apply for the role.

Hogan-Howe, who presided over the disastrous Operation Midland investigation into a fictitious VIP paedophile ring while Scotland Yard commissioner, had been at the centre of a bitter cronyism row when the recruitment process was reopened after he failed to make the final round earlier this year.

Sources said Downing Street had intervened to allow the Prime Minister’s ally another crack at the £223,000-a-year director general role, but it was reported that he has decided against re-applying.

Boris Johnson’s preferred choice for the National Crime Agency top job, Lord Hogan-Howe, has dropped out of the race after deciding not to re-apply for the role

Interviews began this week for the top job at Britain’s equivalent of the FBI, and candidates are thought to include Shaun Sawyer, the departing chief constable of Devon and Cornwall police, who won plaudits for his handling of security for last year’s G7 summit in Cornwall.

Outgoing chairman of the National Police Chiefs’ Council, Sir Martin Hewitt, 56, is also thought to have applied for the job.

And NCA acting director general, Graeme Biggar, who made it to the final two candidates in May before being rejected, has also applied again.

Outgoing chairman of the National Police Chiefs’ Council, Sir Martin Hewitt, 56, is also thought to have applied for the job

The other candidate who made it to the final two, Britain’s former counter-terrorism chief Neil Basu, 53, was said to have been enraged when the process was re-opened and decided not to apply again.

Mr Basu, who is of Indian heritage, had previously clashed with Mr Johnson on race issues.

The Home Office declined to discuss the selection process.

A spokesman said: ‘A fair and open recruitment campaign is under way to make the best possible appointment to this vital role. Recent events have demonstrated how pivotal the NCA is in protecting the public from organised crime and national security threats.’

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