Pictured: Chinese restaurant owner killed in Vienna gun rampage

Pictured: Chinese restaurant owner killed in Vienna gun rampage

November 6, 2020

Pictured: Chinese restaurant owner killed in Vienna gun rampage as university where German student victim studied says ‘words cannot describe the injustice’ of her death

  • Li Quang, 39, owned two businesses in the vicinity of Monday’s terror attack
  • The Chinese national had been living in Austria for more than 25 years 
  • A German national has also been confirmed among the four people killed 
  • The unnamed woman was a student at a local arts university and a waitress 
  •  The Applied Arts University where she and another injured person studied said the attack was an ‘injustice’ that would leave ‘deep traces’ 

Restaurant owner Li Quang has become the second victim of the Vienna terrorist attack to be identified. 

Chinese-born Qiang,39, owned two businesses in the area where a terrorist killed at least four people and injured 23 others on Monday.   

Qiang had lived in Austria for more than 25 years, according to the Chinese Embassy in Vienna, which on Thursday confirmed his death.

Another Chinese national was among those wounded and is recovering in hospital. 

Restaurant owner Li Quang, 39, was confirmed as one of those killed in a terrorist attack in Vienna on Monday. The Chinese national had been living in Austria for more than 25 years and owned two businesses

On Wednesday, a German national was confirmed to be among those killed. 

The unnamed 24-year-old woman had been an art student at a local university who also worked as a waitress. 

On Thursday, the president of the Applied Arts University where she had died, described the terror attack as an injustice that would leave ‘deep traces’.  

Gerald Bast said that another student had been seriously injured and was in hospital recovering from a successful surgery. 

‘Words cannot describe the injustice of these events. All our sympathy, our grief and our compassion go to family and friends of the deceased. All our thoughts and wishes are with the injured student.

‘It’s difficult to understand what happened on Monday evening in our immediate neighbourhood.   

‘The terrible events of this week will leave deep traces. It is all the more important that we show consideration for each other and give place to our grief.

‘The [university] will do everything possible to support all affected university members in this exceptional situation in the best possible way.

Bast added that psychological counselling will be provided to students and faculty from the murdered and injured students’ departments. 

Imams and members of Vienna’s Muslim community pray for the victims of the Vienna terror attack at a makeshift memorial on Thursday

On Wednesday, the first victim of the attack was identified as Nexhip Vrenezi, a 21-year-old Muslim. 

Vrenezi was shot four times outside a pub on the last night before Austria’s new lockdown rules came into force.

Mourners in his hometown Korneuburg 15 miles (25km) from Vienna on Wednesday paid tribute to Vrenezi outside the town hall. 

The vigil came as it emerged that Austrian authorities had been warned that the terrorist Kujtim Fejzulai, 20, had been trying to buy ammunition across the border in Slovakia prior to the attack.  


Nexhip Vrenezi (pictured), 21, was one of the four people killed by gunman Kujtim Fejzulai, 20, in Vienna, Austria, on Monday night

Kujtim Fejzulai, 20, posted this photograph on his Instagram account showing him holding the three weapons he would use in his attack and pledging his allegiance to ISIS leader Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurashi

Also on Wednesday, Austria’s interior minister accused his far-right predecessor of inflicting ‘lasting damage’ on domestic intelligence services.

The domestic intelligence service ‘BVT suffered lasting damage, if not to say was destroyed, by my predecessor Herbet Kickl,’ Karl Nehammer said at a press conference.

A young woman who left a handwritten letter at the vigil for Nexhip wrote: ‘You were one of the best people I have known. You will always be a part of my heart. 

‘You were a good-hearted person, you were one of the few who were really loyal, you were funny, crazy, disturbed – just such a good person!’

His former teacher Helene Fuchs-Moser told BILD: ‘It’s so sad. I am shocked. I still remember him very well. He was a fun-loving, nice guy. And yes, a Muslim [himself].’ 

Nexhip was reportedly a big fan of British boxer Ricky Hatton, played football and dreamed of owning a fast car like a Porsche.

He had just returned home from a six-month stint with the Austrian army and was planning his future career, considering medicine as an option.

Friends described him as a ‘good person’, with one saying he was ‘the type of friend you needed to speak to every day because he was good for your soul.

‘He has gone and many of his friends are crying because he would have done the world so much good like being a doctor or something.

Nexhip was killed after being shot four times on Monday. Pictured: Bullet holes are seen at the door of a restaurant at one of the sites of a terrorist attack

Mourners in Nexhip’s hometown Korneuburg 15 miles (25km)from Vienna came out to pay tribute to the popular man outside the town hall on Wednesday. Pictured: A women lights a candle on Wednesday to commemorate the victims of a terrorist attack in Vienna

‘He and his younger brother were inseparable and played Minecraft and Yugijo together. 

‘We are trying to help him now with love and all be his big brother. But Nexhip’s life has been wasted by this pig.’

Another friend Maya Uruz, 20, said: ‘Many girls had a crush on him because he was a gentleman. He was very popular, a very kind person.’

Meanwhile, police investigating Monday night’s massacre are searching for an elderly man, thought to be an imam, who was an associate of the attacker Fejzulai.

The man caught the attention of local residents after making late night visits to Fejzulai’s second floor apartment in a Viennese suburb.

One neighbour Scherer Hermann told MailOnline: ‘The man had a long beard and always wore a long cloak down to his ankles.

‘He would come to the flat late at night particularly in the past few weeks. Sometimes he would be with a group of men. It was always in the dark and he would never stay very long.

‘I thought it was all very suspicious as he didn’t want to be seen, but I never thought anything like this would happen with Kujtim.

‘I saw him a few hours before he killed those people and he was helping an elderly lady up the stairs with her shopping bags.’ 

Austrian Interior Minister Karl Nehammer confirmed on Wednesday that video evidence showed Fejzulai acted alone in the shooting and stabbing attack. 

The entrance and the building where the terrorist’s apartment is located in the 22nd district of Vienna, Austria

The entrance to the apartment has been sealed by police with an inscription reading: ‘State police department of Vienna – officially sealed’

In the latest security blunder for Austrian intelligence services, it was revealed Fejzulai had tried to buy ammunition in Slovakia this summer but failed – most likely due to not having a gun license. 

Earlier, it had been revealed the ‘lone wolf’ duped officials in a 2019 trial by saying he had been led astray by the ‘wrong mosque’ and then convinced ‘de-radicalisation’ counsellors he had abandoned his support for the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) as part of a parole deal. 

Slovakian police confirmed the attempted purchase of ammunition and said they had immediately alerted Austrian authorities.

Nehammer said an independent panel would investigate the apparent communications failure.

‘The Slovak police noticed in the summer that suspicious people from Austria tried to buy ammunition here,’ Denisa Bárdyová, spokesperson of the Police Corps Presidium, told TASR newswire. 

‘The purchase did not happen though.’ 

Fejzulai was jailed in April 2019 for attempting to Syria to join ISIS but he was granted early release in December under juvenile law because he was under 18 years old at the time of his offence and had agreed to take part in a de-radicalisation program.

At the time, Fejzulai was not deemed capable of carrying out an attack and Nehammer admitted that the terrorist had fooled the country’s judiciary and workers on the de-radicalisation course. 

‘The perpetrator managed to fool the de-radicalisation program of the justice system, to fool the people in it, and to get an early release through this,’ Nehammer said. 

Before murdering four people and injuring 23 more in the attack on Monday night, Fejzulai posted a picture on his Instagram account before the deadly attack. 

The image shows him holding the three weapons he would use in his attack as he pledges his allegiance to ISIS leader Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurashi.

Fejzulai stares directly at the camera while clutching an automatic rifle, pistol and machete. 

He began his attack at 8pm local time near Vienna’s central synagogue before marching through the streets wearing a fake explosives belt and firing at random before he was shot dead by police at 8.09pm.  

Along with the German arts student and Li Quang, a 21-year-old North Macedonian man and a 44-year-old woman were killed. 

Shocking footage shows the gunman carrying an AK-47 and handgun shooting a person in the street during the attack in Vienna

A man carrying what looks like an AK-47 rifle and believed to be the gunman who carried out the rampage in Vienna on Monday evening

A 28-year-old police officer was shot but is said to be in a stable condition, while seven civilians who were injured are in a critical, life-threatening condition. 

The Austrian authorities confirmed a total of 23 people, aged between 21 and 43, were injured. There were seven women among those injured. 

Vienna Police said 13 people – including the 28-year-old police officer – suffered gunshot wounds, whilst others were injured by splinters or while fleeing the scene, according to German media.

Most of the injured are Austrians, but Germans, Slovakians, Afghans, Bosnians and Luxembourgers are also among the wounded. 

Austrian police have arrested 14 people in raids linked to the deadly attack and have found no evidence that a second shooter was involved, minister Nehammer said on Tuesday. 

‘There have been 18 raids in Vienna and Lower Austria and 14 people have been detained,’ Nehammer told a televised press conference.

A map shows where the gunman started and ended his killing spree in Vienna on Monday night 

Initial witness reports had suggested that there were several gunmen holding people hostage, resulting in thousands of police being deployed to the city in search for them, swooping in on 18 addresses and arresting 14.

However, Fejzulai was later found to have acted alone. 

Swiss police on Tuesday also arrested two people in the city of Winterthur as part of an investigation into possible links to Fejzulai, authorities in Zurich said in a statement.

‘The two men were arrested on Tuesday afternoon in coordination with the Austrian authorities,’ Zurich police said.

‘The extent to which there was a connection between the two arrested persons and the alleged assassin is currently the subject of ongoing clarifications and investigations which are being carried out by the responsible authorities.’ 

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz places a candle during a wreath laying ceremony at the crime scene in Vienna on Tuesday. Earlier he said: ‘It is now confirmed that yesterday’s attack was clearly an Islamist terror attack … It was an attack out of hatred – hatred for our fundamental values, hatred for our way of life, hatred for our democracy in which all people have equal rights and dignity.’

French President Emmanuel Macron, centre, is welcomed by Deputy Head of Mission at the Austrian embassy Wolfgang Wagner before signing a condolence book for victims of the Vienna attack, in Paris on Tuesday

Fejzulai’s lawyer in the 2019 case, Nikolaus Rast, told public broadcaster ORF that his client had seemed ‘completely harmless.’

‘He was a young man who was searching for his place in society, who apparently went to the wrong mosque, ended up in the wrong circles,’ Rast said.

Fejzulai’s family ‘wasn’t strictly religious at all; the family wasn’t radical,’ Rast added. ‘I still remember that the family couldn’t believe what had happened with their son.’  

Fejzulai was born and raised in Vienna and was reportedly one of 90 Austrian Islamist fundamentalists known to intelligence because they planned to travel to Syria. 

How jihadist duped officials into believing he was no danger: Vienna shooter said ‘attending the wrong mosque’ led him astray and insisted he renounced ISIS during his terror trial 

The Vienna gunman Kujtim Fejzulai duped officials in a 2019 trial by saying he had been led astray by the ‘wrong mosque’ and had renounced his ISIS ideals. 

Fejzulai, 20, was jailed in April 2019 because he planned to travel to Syria to join ISIS but he was granted early release in December under juvenile law.  

It emerged in Fejzulai’s trial in April, 2019, during which he said that he had ‘got into the wrong mosque’ in 2016.

He said in the trial he did not feel disadvantaged growing up and began studying Islam in the middle of puberty.

Asked why he had tried to join IS, the Austrian-born terrorist told the judge: ‘I wanted to get away from home. I expected a better life. 

‘My own apartment, my own income.’ 

But he had earned enough through his summer job in 2018 to buy plane tickets to Kabul where he had arranged to meet ISIS contacts.

It was only after buying the ticket that Fejzulai realised he needed a visa to travel to Afghanistan.

On September 1, 2019, Fejzulai arrived in Syria alone. He spent two days in a ‘rat hole,’ his lawyer told the court, with ‘no shower, no toilet, no running water’.

He was captured by police after two days and detained in Turkey for four months before being extradited back to Austria where he went under trial. 

His defence lawyer Rudolf Mayer told the court Fejzulai had denounced his IS ideals after his arrest.

He said: ‘How can I change the ideology of a suicide bomber? Not with high fines. You have to change your mind.

‘If [Fejzulai] had not attended a mosque but a Kung Fu school, [he] would have gone to Tibet and become Shaolin monks.’ 

Despite facing between one and ten years imprisonment for membership in a criminal organisation and a terrorist organisation, he was given a reduced sentence of 22 months was granted early release from prison in December.

Interior Minister Karl Nehammer today admitted the terrorist had fooled the judiciary’s de-radicalisation programme. 

Fejzulai’s lawyer in the 2019 case, Nikolaus Rast, told public broadcaster ORF that his client had seemed ‘completely harmless’ at the time.

‘He was a young man who was searching for his place in society, who apparently went to the wrong mosque, ended up in the wrong circles,’ Rast said.

Fejzulai’s family ‘wasn’t strictly religious at all; the family wasn’t radical,’ Rast added. ‘I still remember that the family couldn’t believe what had happened with their son.’

He had Albanian roots and his parents were originally from North Macedonia, Falter editor Florian Kenk wrote on Twitter.   

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said on Tuesday that the attack was launched out of ‘hatred.’

‘It was an attack out of hatred – hatred for our fundamental values, hatred for our way of life, hatred for our democracy in which all people have equal rights and dignity.’ 

His government on Tuesday ordered three days of official mourning, with flags on public buildings to be flown at half-mast until Thursday. 

Germany ChancellorAngela Merkel called Islamist terror the ‘common enemy,’ saying that ‘the fight against these assassins and those who instigate them is our common struggle.’  

The attack came on the final evening before Austria went into lockdown amid rising coronavirus rates, with bars and restaurants in the country closed from midnight and people flocking to enjoy one last night of freedom.

Up to 100 shots from an automatic rifle were heard by one witness.

A total of six crime scenes were set up all in the Innere Stadt – a small area making up the old town of Vienna.

One of those cordons is in place at a well-known restaurant on Ruprechtsplatz 1 where the waitress was shot dead.

Another victim was killed at the Fleischmarkt (meat market) and another at Franz Josefs Kai close to the river.

Further down Franz Josefs Kai, the killer fired and seriously injured a 28-year-old police officer.  

Fejzulai was shot dead nine minutes after his assault started close to the restaurant on Ruprechtsplatz 1 where he had killed the waitress.

Video footage showed the suspect, dressed in white coveralls, firing off bursts apparently at random as he ran down the Austrian capital’s cobblestone streets. 

Other clips showed the man gunning down a person outside what appeared to be a bar with a long-barrelled weapon. He moved down the street before returning to the crumpled body of his victim and then firing at him again, this time with a handgun. 

Oskar Deutsch, the head of the Jewish community in Vienna, said the shooting took place in the street where the city’s main synagogue is located but that it wasn’t clear whether the house of worship had been targeted.

The synagogue was already closed at the time of the shooting, Deutsch tweeted. A neighbouring restaurant was also closed.

Rabbi Schlomo Hofmeister said he saw at least one person fire shots at people sitting outside bars in the street below his window.

‘They were shooting at least 100 rounds just outside our building,’ Hofmeister said. ‘All these bars have tables outside. This evening is the last evening before the lockdown. As of midnight, all bars and restaurants will be closed in Austria for the next month and a lot of people probably wanted to use that evening to be able to go out.’ 

Radical Islam in North Macedonia under spotlight

North Macedonia, a small landlocked country in southeast Europe, is under the spotlight after news emerged that one of its citizens, who had dual Austrian nationality, had killed four people in an Islamist terror attack.

Kujtim Fejzulai’s parents are believed to come from the ethnically diverse state, which like its Western European peers has battled to contain violent extremism on the fringes of its minority Muslim community.

Like many countries in Europe, North Macedonia was a source country for foreign fighters who joined the Islamic State group and other jihadist causes in the Middle East starting in 2012.

A total of 150 citizens including fighters and their wives left the Balkan country for Syria, around half of whom have returned, according to police figures.

While neighbours like Kosovo exported a higher number of fighters per capita, North Macedonia had the highest rate in the Western Balkans relative to the size of its Muslim population, according to a 2018 British Council report.

Most hailed from Albanian neighbourhoods in the capital Skopje, other predominantly Albanian communities and from the large Albanian-origin diaspora in Western Europe.

Fejzulai is said to have Albanian roots.

While the outflow of jihadists abroad stopped almost entirely in 2016, North Macedonia has since had to face the threat of homeland attacks among returnees and other IS sympathisers.

In recent years, police have thwarted several terror plots.

Most recently in September, police arrested three men in their twenties accused of stockpiling weapons for a ‘terrorist’ cell linked to IS.

In February 2019, authorities also said they had prevented ‘terrorist act’ by IS supporters, without elaborating. 

A Turkish national, Recep Tayyip Gultekin, told how he barely escaped death when he heroically carried an injured woman and then the stricken police officer to safety during the attack.

Gultekin was out with a friend when they heard gunshots, he told Turkey’s state-run Anadolu news agency.

‘After I carried the woman to a nearby restaurant, the terrorist pointed his gun at me,’ Gultekin said.

He hurled himself onto the ground to avoid being hit by the rifle but was wounded.

Despite having the shot embedded in his foot, he and his friend managed to get to a nearby police station where they said they saw the policeman who was wounded.

Gultekin and his friend helped carry the 28-year-old officer to an ambulance.

The shooter had ‘shot wildly with an automatic weapon’ before police arrived to intervene, witnesses said. 

‘It sounded like firecrackers, then we realised it was shots,’ said one witness quoted by the public broadcaster ORF. 

Footage believed to be taken near the scene showed people ducking and weaving as they ran for cover, with shots ringing out.

Police sealed off much of the historic centre of the city overnight on Monday, urging the public to shelter in place. 

Many were forced to hide inside hotels and restaurants as police patrolled the streets and warned people to stay inside for fear there were multiple gunmen on the loose. 

One waiter described how police told them: ‘You all have to stay inside because there’s a probably a dead man there.’

‘At the beginning, I thought to myself that maybe we were making an American film or that they had drunk too much,’ said waiter Jimmy Eroglu, 42.  

Robert Schneider, who lives in central Vienna, went out and found two lasers trained on his chest.

‘Hands up, take off your jacket,’ officers shouted at him, the 39-year-old told AFP. ‘We had seen nothing, heard nothing. We are in shock.’ 

Vienna police urged people to avoid all open spaces and public transport in the city. They also said trams and buses were not stopping and urged social media users not to post videos of the police operation, so as not to endanger officers.

Photos and videos from the scene show police officers searching restaurants, cars and people as part of the manhunt.

Czech police said they had started random checks on the country’s border with Austria following Monday’s attack.

‘Police are carrying out random checks of vehicles and passengers on border crossings with Austria as a preventive measure in relation to the terror attack in Vienna,’ the police tweeted.

Reacting to the attack, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: ‘I am deeply shocked by the terrible attacks in Vienna tonight. The UK’s thoughts are with the people of Austria – we stand united with you against terror. 

Home Secretary Priti Patel tweeted: ‘Deeply shocked and saddened by the incident that has taken place in Vienna this evening. My thoughts are with everyone who has been affected and we stand ready to support in any way we can.’

The UK later raised its terror threat level following the incident and other recent attacks in France. 

French President Emmanuel Macron vowed Europe would not bow to terrorists following the attack.

‘We French share the shock and sorrow of the Austrian people following the attack in Vienna,’ Macron tweeted in both French and German. 

‘After France, it is a friendly nation that has been attacked. This is our Europe. Our enemies must know who they’re dealing with. We will concede nothing.’

US President Donald Trump said in a tweet ‘our prayers are with the people of Vienna after yet another vile act of terrorism in Europe.’

‘These evil attacks against innocent people must stop. The U.S. stands with Austria, France, and all of Europe in the fight against terrorists, including radical Islamic terrorists.’

Israeli President Benjamin Netanyahu wrote: ‘Israel condemns the brutal attack in Vienna and stands in total solidarity with Austria. Civilized peoples everywhere must unite to defeat the savagery of resurgent Islamist terrorism.’ 


Turkish national Recep Tayyip Gultekin, who helped carry the wounded 28-year-old police officer to safety after being caught in the crossfire himself on Monday night

The attack came just four days after a knife-wielding Tunisian man beheaded a woman and killed two other people in Nice, France before being shot by police.

Brahim Aoussaoui, 21, allegedly beheaded Nadine Devillers, 60, slit the throat of sexton Vincent Loques, 55, and stabbed mother-of-three Simone Barreto Silva, 44, to death in the horrifying attack.

On October 16, history teacher Samuel Paty was decapitated for showing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in a civics class discussion on free speech.

He became the subject of an online hate campaign over his choice of lesson material – the same images which unleashed a bloody assault by Islamist gunmen on the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo five years ago.

The father of one of Paty’s pupils, who started the social media campaign even though his daughter was not in class when the cartoons were shown, is among seven people charged over the attack.

He had exchanged messages with the killer, 18-year-old Abdullakh Anzorov, a Russian of Chechen descent via WhatsApp in the days leading up to the murder.

Ricard said two teenagers – aged 14 and 15 – were also among the those being prosecuted for their part in a group who shared €300-350 (£270-£315) offered by the killer to help identify Paty.

The pair stayed with Anzorov for more than two hours waiting for the 47-year-old father of one even after the killer told them he wanted to ‘humiliate and strike’ Paty over the Muhammad caricatures, seen as offensive by many Muslims.

Anzorov decapitated Paty with a knife and tweeted an image of the teacher’s severed head on Twitter before he was shot dead by police. 

Timeline of terror: How Europe has been decimated by extremist attacks in recent years   

October 29 2020 – Nice stabbing

Brahim Aoussaoui, 21, (pictured) allegedly beheaded Nadine Devillers, 60, slit the throat of sexton Vincent Loques, 55, and stabbed mother-of-three Simone Barreto Silva, 44, to death in a horrifying attack in Nice

A woman was beheaded and three other people killed in a knife attack at Nice Notre-Dame Basilica on October 29.

Brahim Aoussaoui, 21, allegedly beheaded Nadine Devillers, 60, slit the throat of sexton Vincent Loques, 55, and stabbed mother-of-three Simone Barreto Silva, 44, to death in the horrifying attack. 

Aoussaoui transited through Italy last month en route to France. 

During the attack last week, Aoussaoui arrived in Nice at around 6.30am via the railway station, where he quickly changed his clothes.

CCTV then showed him arriving in the church at 8.30am and staying there for nearly half an hour. 

French anti-terror prosecutors said Aoussaoui attacked worshippers in the heart of the Mediterranean resort city with a foot-long blade.  

October 16 2020 – Beheading of Samuel Paty in France

History teacher Samuel Paty (pictured) was decapitated for showing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in a civics class discussion on free speech on October 16 

History teacher Samuel Paty was decapitated for showing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in a civics class discussion on free speech on October 16.

He became the subject of an online hate campaign over his choice of lesson material – the same images which unleashed a bloody assault by Islamist gunmen on the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo five years ago.

The father of one of Paty’s pupils, who started the social media campaign even though his daughter was not in class when the cartoons were shown, is among seven people charged over the attack. 

He had exchanged messages with the killer, 18-year-old Chechnya-born Abdullakh Anzorov, via WhatsApp in the days leading up to the murder.

Ricard said that two teenagers – aged 14 and 15 – were also among the those being prosecuted for their part in a group who shared €300-350 (£270-£315) offered by the killer to help identify Paty.

The pair stayed with Anzorov for more than two hours waiting for the 47-year-old father of one even after the killer told them he wanted to ‘humiliate and strike’ Paty over the Muhammad caricatures, seen as offensive by many Muslims.

Anzorov decapitated Paty with a knife and tweeted an image of the teacher’s severed head on Twitter before he was shot dead by police.

French President Emmanuel Macron watched the coffin of slain teacher Samuel Paty being carried into the courtyard of the Sorbonne university during a national memorial event in Paris last night

October 12 2020 – Zagreb shooting 

Danijel Bezuk, 22, fired shots at a Croatian government building using an assault rifle.

Bezuk wounded a police officer in the attack before taking his own life.   

October 4 2020 – Dresden stabbing 

One German tourist was stabbed to death and another injured in an attack in Dresden on October 4.  

Abdullah AHH, 20 – a young Syrian ISIS supporter – was arrested.

He was previously  jailed for two years and nine months in 2018 as an 18-year-old and was released from jail just five days before he allegedly attacked and wounded the visitors from western Germany in downtown Dresden.

The victims, one aged 53 and the other 55, were German men from the western state of North Rhine-Westphalia on vacation in Dresden, according to the police.

They were severely injured in the knife attack and the 55-year-old later died.

Syrian ISIS supporter Abdullah AHH (pictured), 20, was arrested after a tourist was stabbed to death and another seriously injured in the eastern German city of Dresden on October 4, authorities said today

September 25 2020 –  Stabbing in Paris outside the former offices of the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine

Two people were stabbed with a meat cleaver in Paris on September 25 this year.

The attack happened near the former offices of the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine, where Islamist militants carried out a deadly attack in 2015. 

The September attack was dubbed an ‘act of Islamist terrorism’ by France’s interior minister and two suspects were arrested separately shortly after the stabbing.

Police arrested two men – a ‘main perpetrator’ and another suspect – after one was spotted with blood dripping from his clothes near the Opera Bastille. The other was stopped at a Metro station.

The main suspect is said to be an 18-year-old called Ali, who was known to the police, while the second man was described as a 33-year-old Algerian.

Three others were also later detained in relation to the attack, a judicial source said.

Two people were stabbed with a meat cleaver in Paris on September 25 this year. Pictured: A suspect being detained after the attack 

‘Knife-obsessed’ terrorist Sudesh Amman, 20, was shot dead by police after stabbing two people in Streatham in February 

February 2 2020 – Streatham stabbing  

‘Knife-obsessed’ terrorist Sudesh Amman, 20, was shot dead by police after stabbing two people in Streatham in February. 

He went on a rampage in south London, stabbing a man in his 40s in the stomach and a female cyclist in her 50s in the back, though both survived.

Amman, from Harrow, was automatically released from prison just a few days before the attack. 

He was jailed for three years and four months in December 2018 after he pleaded guilty to possessing and distributing terrorist documents.

 The then-18-year-old fantasised about carrying out a terror attack with a blade or with acid while riding a moped and also shared Al Qaeda propaganda on a WhatsApp group used by his family.

Wearing a fake suicide vest, Amman stole a £3.99 blade from a convenience store and stabbed the man, in his 40s, in the stomach before knifing a female cyclist, in her 50s, in the back.

Armed police were on the scene within minutes, having been following him because they suspected he was going to launch a terrorist attack imminently. After he failed to stop, Amman was shot dead outside a Boots chemist.

After the rampage, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said the government would announce further plans for ‘fundamental changes to the system for dealing with those convicted of terrorism offences’ on Monday.

A Whitehall source claimed he was released despite concerns because the law didn’t give them the power to keep him in jail.

Amman (pictured on the floor) went on a rampage in south London, stabbing a man in his 40s in the stomach and a female cyclist in her 50s in the back, though both survived

November 29, 2019 – London Bridge stabbing 

Terrorist Usman Khan, 28, killed Cambridge University graduates Saskia Jones, 23, and Jack Merritt, 25, during a prisoner rehabilitation event near London Bridge on November 29 last year.

Khan, who was armed with two knives and wore a fake suicide vest, was tackled by members of the public with a narwhal tusk, a decorative pike and fire extinguisher.

The attacker, who had been living alone in Stafford, was then shot dead by police on London Bridge.

A bystander of the terror attack is seen attempting to fight off Usman Khan with a narwhal tusk on London Bridge, Khan was later shot dead by police on the bridge

October 9, 2019 – Halle synagogue shooting

Anti-Semite Stephan Balliet, 28, allegedly shot dead Jana Lange, 40, who witnessed him struggling to get into a synagogue in 2019.

He also shot 20-year-old football fan Kevin S, who had been working at a building site nearby, a court heard.

He is also accused of repeatedly trying but failing to force his way into the synagogue with 52 worshippers inside.

October 3, 2019 – Paris police headquarters stabbing

Police employee Mickael Harpon, 45, stabbed four colleagues to death after it was revealed he openly praised the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

Harpon left headquarters only to return with an oyster knife and a 13-inch kitchen knife, slitting the throat of at least one of his victims. He was shot dead by a policeman.

Computer expert Harpon had caused serious concern among colleagues as far back as 2015 when he defended the massacre of 12 people at the Charlie Hebdo newspaper by two brothers vowing allegiance to Al-Qaeda. 


Mickael Harpon, 45, was shot dead by a policeman after he stabbed four colleagues to death in a frenzied attack at Paris police headquarters. Right: Two emergency service members attend the corpse of Harpon outside the famed police headquarters in the centre of Paris

August 10, 2019 – Bærum mosque shooting 

A gunman injured one man when he opened fire on the Al-Noor Islamic Centre, just outside of Oslo.

Philip Manshaus, a 21-year-old Norwegian, was sentenced to 21 years in prison for terrorism and murder.

He is also accused of killing his younger stepsister while she slept in her bed. She suffered a gunshot to her chest and three bullets to her head.  

June 2, 2019 – Murder of Walter Luebcke

Walter Luebcke, who was known to have pro-migrant views, was found dead at his home in the city of Kassel on June 2, 2019.

Luebcke – who was a politician and colleague of Chancellor Angela Merkel – had been shot dead at close range by a single shot to the head. 

An autopsy ruled out suicide as a cause of death in what appeared to be an assassination-style hit.  

German neo-Nazi Stephan Ernst, 46, admitted to the killing.  

Federal prosecutors have said Ernst was motivated by ‘racism and xenophobia’ when he shot Luebcke in the head.

Walter Luebcke, who was known to have pro-migrant views, was found dead at his home in the city of Kassel on June 2, 2019 

May 24, 2019 – Lyon bomb explosion

Thirteen people – including a young girl – were wounded after nail bomb went off outside a bakery in Lyon on May 24. 

A 24-year-old man was arrested and police at the time said he was a suspect bomber.

He had been the target of an extensive manhunt after the explosive device was placed in front of the bakery near the corner of two crowded pedestrian streets in the historic centre of Lyon.

Police circulated photos of the suspect on Twitter, leading to ‘several dozen’ calls from people with information.

Sources close to the investigation suspected the explosive was acetone peroxide, or APEX, a volatile compound used in the deadly Paris attacks on November 13, 2015.  

Investigators recovered small screws, ball bearings and batteries along with a printed circuit and a remote-controlled trigger device. Officials later said the charge was relatively weak.

Thirteen people were wounded in the blast – eight women, four men and a 10-year-old girl – of whom 11 needed hospital treatment. 

March 18, 2019 – Dutch tram shooting 

Gokmen Tanis, 38, shot four people dead in a gun attack on a Dutch tram on March 18. 

He was jailed for life after being found guilty of murder with a terrorist motive over an attack on a tram near Utrech central station. 

Tanis carried out his attack by shooting people from close range with a silenced pistol on a tram in the Dutch city around 10.45am.

One victim, a 19-year-old woman, was shot while talking on the phone with her boss. Another was shot as she leaped from the tram, Dutch News reported.  

Tanis then got off the tram and shot another person sitting behind the wheel of a car before fleeing.

Several people reported hearing Tanis shouting ‘Allahu Akbar’ as he fired the shots, while he also left behind a note in a stolen car which said ‘I’m doing this for my belief. You are killing Muslims.

‘You want to take our belief away from us, but it won’t work.’

Five people were injured in total, four of whom later died of their wounds.

Recent violent attacks by radicalised mentally ill people are ‘impossible to distinguish’ from terrorism, a new report by Europol has warned. Gokmen Tanis (above), 38, who shot four people dead on a tram in Utrecht, Netherlands, on March 18, 2019, was convicted for terrorism – but his personality disorder played an important part in motivating him to carry out the attack

April 7, 2018 – Munster car attack

Interior designer and bodybuilder Jens Ruther, 48, drove a van into a group of people sitting outside a restaurant in the old city centre of Muenster in Germany.

He killed two in the attack before shooting himself. 

He is understood to have been a heavy metal fanatic who had been ‘badly affected’ by narrowly missing the attacks on the Bataclan in Paris in 2015. 

He had told friends of his ‘shock’ that he had attended a concert at the Bataclan shortly before the ISIS atrocity that left 89 dead. 

March 23, 2018 – Carcassonne and Trebes attacks

Radouane Lakdim went on a rampage through Carcassonne and Trebes that saw him hold up a car, fire on police and take hostages in a supermarket, screaming ‘Allahu Akbar’. Security forces then stormed the building and killed him.

Jean Mazieres, 60, was killed by Lakdim during the carjacking; Christian Medves, 50, was shot in the supermarket, where he worked as a butcher; and construction worker Herve Sosna, 65, was a customer in the supermarket.

Hero gendarme Arnaud Beltrame died after swapping places with a hostage. 

June 3, 2017 – London Bridge attack

Three attackers rammed a van into pedestrians on London Bridge then stabbed revellers in nearby bars, killing eight people and injuring at least 48. 

Islamic State says its militants are responsible. 

May 22, 2017 – Manchester Arena bombing 

Salman Abedi kills 22 children and adults and wounds 59 at crowded Manchester arena, as crowds begin to leave a concert by US singer Ariana Grande.

A suicide bomber kills 22 children and adults (some pictured) and wounds 59 in Manchester 

Crowds were beginning to leave the concert by US singer Ariana Grande when the bomb went off (some victims pictured

March 22, 2017 – Westminster attack 

Khalid Masood, 52, drove a 4×4 vehicle at pedestrians at speeds of up to 76mph on Westminster bridge.

He then stabbed PC Keith Palmer to death which the officer was guarding the main vehicle entrance to parliament. 

Six people died – including Masood who was shot by a police officer – and at least 20 were injured in what police called a ‘marauding terrorist attack’.  

December 19, 2016 – Berlin Christmas market attack

Anis Amri drove a truck  into a crowded Christmas market in central Berlin, killing 12 people and injuring 48. 

The truck’s original driver Łukasz Urban was found dead in the passenger seat after he was shot.

The vehicle’s automatic breaks eventually stopped the attacker – who was then killed four days later in a shoot out.  

July 26, 2016 – Normandy church attack

Adel Kermiche and Abdel Malik Petitjean – both 19 – killed 85-year-old priest Jacques Hamel with a blade and seriously wounded one other hostage in a church in northern France before being shot dead by French police.

The two hostage-takers had pledged allegiance to Islamic State. They were shot dead when trying to leave the church.

July 22, 2016 – Munich shooting 

David Ali Sonboly, 18, shot dead nine people at a Munich shopping mall before turning the gun on himself, having spent a year planning the rampage.

Police said the German-Iranian teen was ‘obsessed’ with mass murderers such Norwegian right-wing fanatic Anders Behring Breivik and had no links to the Islamic State (IS) group. 

The attack was carried out on the fifth anniversary of twin attacks by Norwegian mass murderer Breivik that killed 77 people. 

July 14, 2016 – Nice truck attack

On Bastille Day Tunisian-born local Mohamed Lahouaiej-Bouhlel drove a 19-tonne truck into a crowd celebrating the national holiday on the Promenade des Anglais.

A total of 86 people were killed, and some 434 were injured in the terrorist atrocity.

Lahouaiej-Bouhlel suffered from psychiatric problems, but he claimed a loose affiliation to ISIS before carrying out the crime, which ended with him also being shot dead.  

March 22, 2016 – Brussels bombings

Three Islamic State suicide bombers, all Belgian nationals, blew themselves up at Brussels airport and in a metro train in the Belgian capital, killing 32 people. At least 300 people were injured.

Police found links with attacks in Paris the previous November.

November 13, 2015 – Paris attacks

Paris is rocked by multiple, near simultaneous gun-and-bomb attacks on entertainment sites around the city, in which 130 people die and 368 are wounded. Islamic State claimed responsibility. 

Two of the 10 known perpetrators were Belgian citizens and three others were French. 

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