Ex-FA boss wins right to bulldoze his £3m home and build £5m mansion

Ex-FA boss wins right to bulldoze his £3m home and build £5m mansion

March 30, 2022

Former FA boss and £700k-a-year BT chairman Adam Crozier wins right to bulldoze his new £3m Surrey home and build dream £5m five-bedroom mansion in its place

  • Adam Crozier, 58, splashed out £3million on house on a private estate last year
  • BT chairman has just been given permission to demolish and rebuild property 
  • He will erect a mansion with special provision for his learning disabled daughter
  • The house will also feature a snug, verandah, and a comms and electrics room

Former FA boss Adam Crozier who is now the chairman of BT has won the right to bulldoze his new home and build a dream £5million mansion in its place.  

Crozier, 58, who oversaw the closure of 5,800 Post Office branches, splashed out £3million on a five-bedroom house on a private estate in Surrey last year.

The £700,000-a-year chairman has just been given local council permission to demolish the 1960s-built property and build a five-bedroom ‘Arts & Crafts’-style mansion with special provision for his learning disabled adult daughter.  

The house will also feature a snug, verandah, and a comms and electrics room. 

Planning documents previously revealed that a bat survey identified droppings from brown long-eared bats in the attic of the existing house, which has been remodelled several times over the years.  

Adam Crozier (pictured with his wife Annette in July 2016), 58, who oversaw the closure of 5,800 Post Office branches, splashed out £3million on a five-bedroom house on a private estate in Surrey last year

The £700,000-a-year chairman has just been given local council permission to demolish the 1960s-built property (pictured) and build a five-bedroom ‘Arts & Crafts’-style mansion with special provision for his learning disabled adult daughter

Crozier’s proposed new mansion (illustration above), which will be worth around £5million, will also feature a snug, verandah, and a comms and electrics room

A design and access statement that accompanied his planning application stated: ‘The number of droppings recorded indicated occasional use by individual bats.’

As a result, the report earlier predicted that a European Protected Species Licence was needed to be obtained to allow the project to proceed.

The plans proposed that four bat boxes be installed on adjacent trees during the building work to create somewhere for the creatures to roost. 

The proposed new house has a ground floor hall, sitting room, study, kitchen, dining room, a lift, a snug, verandah, as well as a communications and electrics room.

There is also a jacuzzi under an oak-framed covered terrace leading from a snug room off the family kitchen.

Plans showed the terrace will step down to an area of natural stone paving surrounding an outdoor swimming pool overlooked by a Gaze Burvill curved bench seat.

The design statement had stated that Crozier and his wife want to create an ‘Arts & Crafts style family home that provides comfortable and informal accommodation with a sense of established heritage.’

It added: ‘The applicants see this proposal as their forever family home where grandchildren will come to stay and where they can make provision for their adult learning disabled daughter, cared for at home, supported overnight with a carer.

‘The proposed dwelling has been rotated to benefit the sunlight and views over the garden to the south.

‘Leading off from the family kitchen/living room is an oak-framed covered terrace with Jacuzzi, which steps down to natural stone paving surrounding the swimming pool.

Planning documents previously revealed that a bat survey identified droppings from brown long-eared bats in the attic of the existing house, which has been remodelled several times over the years

The floor plans for the proposed new house which has a ground floor hall, sitting room, study, kitchen, dining room, lift, snug, verandah, and a communications and electrics room

Crozier (pictured) was chief executive of The Football Association from 1999 until 2002 when he modernised and reorganised the institution, and dramatically increased revenues

‘The existing buildings on the site are of limited merit and require considerable refurbishment and as a consequence the applicants have decided to replace with a single holistic design.

‘Mr and Mrs Crozier are committed to a long-term approach to the house and site. They would like to erect a replacement house of good quality, natural materials and implement a sensitive landscaping plan, which will conserve and reinforce the existing natural landscape.’

The statement went on to say that the new house will have air source heating and ‘rainwater harvesting to meet and exceed current building standards for energy and water efficiency’.

It added that the house will be ‘highly efficient’ through ‘optimised insulation levels, passive solar gain and thermal mass’.

The exclusive area around the house is home to celebrities including TV presenters Eamonn Holmes and Michael Aspel, and Dragons’ Den star Theo Pathitis, as well as a number of Russian tycoons. 

Crozier has had a string of leading roles in big name organisations, but not without controversy.

He was chief executive of The Football Association from 1999 until 2002 when he modernised and reorganised the institution, and dramatically increased revenues.

Crozier’s current home, located on a private estate in Weybridge, Surrey, is thought to cost around £3million

The design statement had stated that Crozier and his wife want to create an ‘Arts & Crafts style family home that provides comfortable and informal accommodation with a sense of established heritage’ 

The exclusive area around the current house is home to celebrities including TV presenters Eamonn Holmes and Michael Aspel, and Dragons’ Den star Theo Pathitis

Crozier also brought in Sven-Goran Eriksson as the national team’s first non-English coach and proceeded with plans for a new Wembley stadium.

But he was accused of sometimes acting beyond his brief, acting with a lack of consultation and raising expectations too high.

He became chief executive of the Royal Mail between 2003 and 2010 when he oversaw a programme of modernisation and redundancies.

Under his leadership, around 5,800 local post offices were closed with the second post and Sunday collections axed to save costs.

The price of a first-class stamp also jumped up by 14p to a record 41p during his tenure.

He was made chief executive of ITV from 2010 to 2017 and took up his top role at BT earlier this month.

Even though he has had prominent business roles, Crozier has previously admitted he hates publicity and is ‘softly spoken’.

The Scotsman told the Guardian in 2007: ‘I hate it, absolutely hate it. The bizarre thing about the last three jobs I’ve done is that I don’t like [the public profile] at all.’

He added: ‘I will go to enormous lengths not to do public things – because it is just not me.’

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