Crossrail's deputy chief steps down amid more delays

Crossrail's deputy chief steps down amid more delays

February 14, 2020

Crossrail’s deputy chief steps down amid more delays as workers are pictured fitting platform signs and escalators at new stations – that won’t open until summer 2021

  • Crossrail’s deputy chief Chris Sexton, who was paid £230,707 in 2017/18, will step down from the project
  • He will be replaced by former HS2 phase one managing director Jim Crawford, who was paid £393,000
  • The 73-mile railway built between Berkshire and Essex was meant to open in December 2018 initially 

Crossrail’s deputy chief has stepped down amid further delays as workers have been pictured fitting platform signs and escalators at stations that aren’t expected to open until 2021.

Chris Sexton, who was paid £230,707 for his management of the beleaguered project in 2017/18, will be replaced by former HS2 phase one managing director Jim Crawford, reports Construction News.

Mr Crawford was paid £393,000 for his management of the heavily-criticised rail project, which has seen costs balloon to as much as £88billion. It is unclear how much he will be paid while working for Crossrail.

The 73-mile new railway that will allow commuters to travel across London between Berkshire and Essex was initially meant to open in December 2018, reports BBC News, but continued delays and a ballooning budget have seen its opening date continually pushed back.  

Pictures from the new line show workers adding parts to new stations at Liverpool Street, Farringdon and Paddington ahead of the anticipated opening.

They also show workers checking power cable for escalators constructed for the new railway line. 

Crossrail workers pictured preparing the new platform at Liverpool Street station for the Crossrail line. Deputy chief Chris Sexton has stepped down and will be replaced by former HS2 phase one managing director Jim Crawford

Pictured above are escalators on the new line. It was meant to open in December 2018 but constant delays have seen this pushed back to as late as summer 2021

New platform for Crossrail at Farringdon station (above). The beleaguered project has been plagued by spiralling costs

A worker pictured walking through a Crossrail tunnel at Liverpool Street station. The line is not meant to open until 2021

A sign for Crossrail – which will be named the Elizabeth line in the Queen’s honour – pictured after being unveiled for the line’s stop in Paddington. It runs underneath London between Berkshire and Essex

Four escalators for the new line pictured at Liverpool Street station as a worker checks electrics at the station

A construction team worker peaks through the barrier at the new Crossrail Liverpool Street station


A corridor for use by commuters has its electrics checked (left) and a grill is installed on a station platform (right) at Liverpool Street station. The 73-mile line was initially planned to open in December 2018

Men pictured hard at work at the new platform for Liverpool Street – which won’t open until Summer 2021

Workers are shown here gradually removing wooden protectors from the new escalators at the entrance to Liverpool Street

The platform at Paddington station, pictured today, appears to have been completed – but it won’t open until 2021

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