Adult walks with child just feet from massive crashing seafront wave

Adult walks with child just feet from massive crashing seafront wave

January 11, 2023

Madness! Adult walks with child just feet from massive crashing seafront wave as Met Office warns more heavy wind and rain is on way for UK tomorrow

  •  A housing estate in Tewkesbury, Gloustershire, was nearly cut off by flood water after the River Severn burst
  • Other parts of the historic town were also left under several feet of water following the deluge of bad weather 
  • The Met Office has yellow weather warnings for rain and wind across parts of the country until Thursday 

Shocking photos show the moment an adult is walking with a young child just feet away from a massive  crashing seafront wave as the Met Office warns of more heavy downpours battering Britain.

The pair were photographed walking along the beachfront in Blackpool, Lancashire, today as strong winds and rain towered over the sea. 

It comes as a housing estate in Tewkesbury, Gloustershire, became an island and was almost completely cut off by flood water after the River Severn burst its banks following days of torrential rain.

The Met Office has yellow weather warnings for rain and wind across parts of the country until tomorrow. There currently remains 34 flood warnings and 98 flood alerts in place across England.

Shocking photos show the moment an adult is walking with a young child just feet away from a massive crashing seafront wave as the Met Office warns of more heavy downpours battering Britain 

The pair were photographed walking along the beachfront in Blackpool, Lancashire, today as strong winds and rain towered over the sea 

Dramatic photographs show how King Johns Court housing estate in Tewkesbury was marooned by water today, as well as the local pub The Boat House.

Other parts of the historic town were also left under several feet of water following the deluge of bad weather.

There were similar scenes in neighbouring Worcester where Worcester Racecourse and Worcestershire County Council Cricket ground remain submerged.

Forecasters have warned of more local river and surface water flooding throughout the remainder of the week. 

The Environment Agency said: ‘Local river and surface water flooding impacts are probable in parts of South West England and possible in parts of the North and far South of England and the Midlands later Wednesday into Thursday with river flooding impacts continuing into Friday.

‘Slower responding rivers, particularly in parts of the West Midlands and North East England, are likely to remain high through the next five days leading to further river flooding impacts.’

The agency warned that river and surface water flooding impacts are also possible across parts of the North of England over the weekend.

‘Local groundwater flooding is possible through the next five days in the south of England,’ forecasters warned. ‘Land, roads and some properties could flood and there could be travel disruption.’

High winds are shown hitting the Blackpool seafront as the Met Office warns of more heavy downpours battering Britain 

 An adult and child walk along the seafront as waves ravage in Blackpool today

A car drives along the promenade where waves crash over, in Blackpool, Lancashire, as a yellow weather warning is issued for the region

Waves crash over the Blackpool promenade as a man jogs amid Wednesday’s bad weather

A man runs along the promenade in Blackpool as waves crash over on Wednesday

The Environment Agency’s warning comes as fire chiefs have slammed ‘crazy’ drivers for ignoring flooded road warning signs and ending up calling for help.

The River Ouse is surrounding riverside properties in York and is projected to rise rapidly through the rest of today to almost four metres above normal summer levels.

But despite a stream of warning messages, North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is continuing to receive calls from motorists who have become stranded in floodwater.

Some have driven straight past ‘road closed’ signs, said exasperated Fire Group Manager Bob Hoskins. 

‘Latest call is a car which has become stranded after driving past a car already stranded!’ he said.

A recording machine on the Ouse in York says the river had risen to just over three metres above normal summer levels by 8.45am today.

It says the river is forecast to peak at 3.92 metres at midday tomorrow, but adds the warning ‘Forecasts come from a computer model and can change.’

Such a height would be the worst flooding on the river so far this winter, but would still be half a metre lower than the 4.5 metres reached during the floods of last February.

Dramatic photographs show how King Johns Court housing estate in Tewkesbury was marooned by water today, as well as the local pub The Boat House

The estate was almost completely cut off by flood water after the River Severn burst its banks following days of torrential rain

With more heavy rain forecast, thousands of people living near the River Thames close to Windsor Castle are facing a royal nightmare.

Residents in Old Windsor and the nearby villages of Datchet, Horton and Wraysbury are anxiously watching the rising water levels surging past their homes amid fears after an affordable insurance scheme is pulled.

The first stage of the River Thames Scheme, called Channel One, a defence plan which would have shielded the villages from flooding, won’t be going ahead.

After the major nation-wide 2014 flood disaster, which saw Datchet and Wraysbury become the epicentre of media and political attention, the Government set up a scheme in 2016 called ‘Flood Re’ to enable 85 insurance companies to provide household flood cover at an affordable price.

According to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), Flood Re has covered over 256,000 household policies in 2021/22 and more than 450,000 properties have benefitted since its launch.

Before the scheme came along, householders who had made prior flood claims could not get quotes from five or more insurers.

However, Flood Re will only last until 2039, and many villagers fear they will have to pay out hundreds of thousands of pounds to stay insured.

Some say they can’t afford that, leaving their homes unsellable or unable to be mortgaged.

Owners planning to sell up will find prospective buyers are put off because of the flood insurance risk, and their homes could be blighted.

Properties currently worth £1 million-plus, as many are in the affluent villages near Windsor, may slump to a rock-bottom price.

Villagers are campaigning for the reinstatement of the flood defence scheme Channel One, which the Royal Borough Council of Windsor and Maidenhead deemed unaffordable.

A vehicle was caught in flood waters around Tewkesbury Abbey today. Parts of the historic town were also left under several feet of water following the deluge of bad weather

The King Johns Court housing estate was flooded today following torrential rain. Forecasters have warned of more local river and surface water flooding throughout the remainder of the week

A car is caught in flooded waters near Tewkesbury Abbey following heavy rainfall

Dramatic photographs show how the village of Tewkesbury was marooned by water today

The effect of a lack of flood defences is already affecting peoples’ insurance, some villagers have claimed.

Wraysbury flood warden Dave Francis, who attended meetings with then Prime Minister David Cameron during the 2014 flood event, said his insurance used to be £720 but soared to a staggering £5,600, and he blames the scrapping of Channel One.

He now fears with the removal of the promised Channel One, he won’t be able to get cover.

Datchet Parish Council chairman David Buckley said a resident was quoted to pay £250,000 as an ‘excess’ before an insurance company will pay out if his property flooded.

He said ‘Once Flood Re finishes, there is concern the government won’t renew it because of climate change and coastal erosion due to finances.

‘It means areas like us won’t be insurable, meaning people won’t get mortgaged and won’t sell their property.

‘People find it very hard to get insurance, but they have this security that they can get insurance at an affordable rate while this Flood Re is in place.’

A Flood Re spokesperson said: ‘Our purpose is to create a more resilient market within 25 years of our creation and leave behind a long-lasting legacy that will positively impact future generations beyond our 2039 exit date.

‘It is important that our legacy leaves not only a resilient market but also a resilient nation of homes.

‘However, success will be a collective effort, requiring positive action from the public, insurers, developers, and government.

‘We at Flood Re, motivated by the reality of our 2039 deadline, will not cease in our commitment to ensure that the UK, despite the increase in extreme weather events, is always able to manage its present and future flood risk.’

DEFRA said it is working with the council and the Environment Agency on a new River Thames flood defence scheme that will ‘protect properties between Datchet and Hythe End’. But as the project is in its early stages, details are unclear.

DEFRA have urged resident to sign-up for its flood warning service.

Meanwhile further upstream in Oxfordshire, Hollywood film star George Clooney and his neighbours are anxiously watching water levels in the River Thames today as the relentless rain causes floods mayhem in many parts of Britain.

George, his lawyer wife Amal and their children live in a £10million millhouse yards from the swirling river at Sonning near Oxford which has had its garden flooded several times in the past.

Former Prime Minister Theresa May also has a home in the village but it is relatively safe from flooding as it is on higher ground.

The EA warned Oxford residents living near the Thames this week, with more rain on the cards ‘Flooding is possible – be prepared.

‘River levels are high on the River Thames. Therefore, flooding of low lying paths, roads and land is expected to continue on the River Thames and its tributaries throughout Oxford.

‘It is expected that river levels will slowly rise over the coming days in response to rainfall before stabilising later in the week.

‘Our incident response staff are operating weirs to reduce flood risk.

‘Please remain safe and aware of your local surroundings, be aware of flood water and avoid using low lying footpaths near watercourses.’

Similarly, a farmer and his family – who host Riding for the Disabled lessons – have been made prisoners in their own home for a month after torrential rain has caused a nearby river to burst its banks and the only road leading to his property into a waterway.

OAP Ian Lucken, who has previously entertained the Princess Royal at his farm along with his wife, three children and two grandchildren, said that at times the water level on the road and surrounding fields was four-and-a-half feet deep, making it impossible to wade through.

The 78-year-old, who suffers from Parkinson’s disease and diabetes, said that the family had been unable to get out of the house in Twyford, Berkshire, since December 12 when the River Loddon last burst its banks.

The only means the family have of getting out to buy food, obtain medication and stock up on other essentials, is aboard the unreliable farm tractor.

However, because of his Parkinson’s problems, Mr Lucken is unable to climb onto the tractor and has to rely on his son to drive the machine out and through the deep water.

The family usually hosts Riding for the Disabled at their farm in Twyford and the the Princess Royal showed huge interest in their work. They also discussed the problems caused by the flooding on the road and the Princess Royal disclosed that some parts of Windsor Castle also got flooded.

OAP Ian Lucken and his family have been unable to get out of their house in Twyford, Berkshire, since December 12 when the River Loddon last burst its banks. Pictured: The Lower River Loddon flooded near Lands End, Charvil on December 21, 2022

A view of the River Loddon at Lands End, Charvil amid the floods on December 21, 2022

Water levels at Lands End, Charvil reached nearly 5feet last month after the River Loddon flooded. Pictured: The water levels on December 21, 2022

He has appealed to local authority Wokingham Borough Council to try to get the road level raised but claims his pleas have fallen on deaf ears with the council saying the situation is not its problem.

Mr Lucken has lived on his farm for 65 years. Only his son and one of his daughters are able to escape the house for essential supplies using a the re-purposed tractor – which also sometimes refuses to start.

The frustrated pensioner said today: ‘The dustmen can’t get to us. They won’t come in because of the deep water which stretches hundreds of yards. The postman won’t come in. Nobody would come in to deliver any parcels or anything.

‘My daughter has got MS, I’ve got Parkinsons and I’ve got diabetes as well, so we have to get medication. We have a hell of a job to get it.

‘What we have to do is get the tractor and drive it through as much as we can when it’s not too high.

‘It’s about four feet deep at the moment. Even with half an inch of rainfall now, it comes up straight away. There is a ford near the house and there are marker boards there which show the water is presently more than 4ft deep. Any cars trying to use the road would be flooded straightaway

‘We are just a normal family trying to earn a living. We do riding school lessons here but we haven’t had any rides in for more than a month.’

He claimed that Wokingham Borough Council had been refusing to help, saying the flooding was his responsibility.

When he contacted the council over the latest round of flooding, he maintained he was met with a resolute refusal to help him by building up the road to make access easier.

In the past, the flooding has led the farmer to having to spend heavily for a new septic tank which cost him £10,000 – an amount he says has never been refunded by the council.

‘This happened in 2013 and the flooding was up for three-and-a-half months then and stopped our income. Due to heavy rainfall, the only road in or out of the farm is currently submerged and only accessible via the family’s tractor.

Mr Lucken said that he had notified the council for more than 15 years about the frequent flooding, following housing development on a nearby floodplain.

He claimed he had had 15 years of issues due to Wokingham Borough Council building 700 homes on the floodplains.

He added that the council had once installed a sign to warn cars but that it had not stopped some vehicles being swept away by flood water.

The council has been contacted for comment but has not responded to requests for a statement. A spokesman pointed out however that the complaints by Mr Lucken had been referred to the Ombudsman who ruled that the council had done what it could to assist the farmer.

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