Millennial who sails around world on luxury yacht has her baby

Millennial who sails around world on luxury yacht has her baby

December 20, 2018

‘I can’t wait to show Lenny the world’: Millennial couple who quit their jobs to sail around the world for a living reveal plans to raise their newborn at sea

  • Elayna Carausu and Riley Whitelum are sailing the world funded by followers
  • The blogging couple have given birth to their first child, Lennon, this week 
  • The 26 and 35-year-olds intend to continue sailing with their baby on board
  • Elayna said: ‘I can’t wait to show Lenny the world’; they set sail this month 

They’re the couple circumnavigating the globe on a luxury yacht funded by their YouTube fans.

And now, Australian Sailing La Vagabonde bloggers, Elayna Carausu, 26, and Riley Whitelum, 35, have added one more to their motley crew: Lennon. 

The couple gave birth to little ‘Lenny Foster Whitelum’ on December 6, announcing the news online this week – and Elayna told FEMAIL that they have no intention of stopping sailing around the world with a baby on board.

‘I just can’t wait to show Lenny the world,’ Elayna told Daily Mail Australia.

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And now, Australian Sailing La Vagabonde bloggers, Elayna Carausu, 26, and Riley Whitelum, 35, have given birth to their first child: Lennon (all pictured)


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The couple gave birth to little ‘Lenny Foster Whitelum’ on December 6 – and Elayna told FEMAIL that they have no intention of stopping sailing around the world with a baby on board

While Elayna and Riley originally had planned to give birth on board the boat, the millennials said they swiftly changed their plans when they realised the potential for things to go wrong

While Elayna and Riley originally had planned to give birth on board the boat, the millennials said they swiftly changed their plans when they realised the potential for things to go wrong.

‘I knew if everything didn’t go as planned we would end up with a 100k bill,’ Elayna explained to FEMAIL. 

Instead, they came back home to Adelaide, where they could be with families and have access to the health system and insurance.

The pair have left their boat in South Carolina, where they will pick it up in a month’s time with Lennon – they then intend to either sail down the east coast of the USA or back to the Bahamas.

Speaking about her gruelling 44-hour labour, Elayna said she started having contractions on December 4, at four days overdue.

‘However, because the contractions were just five or six minutes apart I didn’t call our midwife, who said to notify her when the surges were about 3-4 minutes apart or if I showed signs of my labour progressing,’ she said.


They have left their boat in South Carolina, where they will pick it up in a month’s time with Lennon – they then intend to either sail down the east coast of the USA or back to the Bahamas

While Elayna wanted to give birth at home in water, when Lennon didn’t come the couple (pictured) rushed to the hospital for Elayna to give birth 44 hours later

The 26-year-old said that ‘day soon turned into night and I could no longer sit down as I had to be standing or squatting and holding or leaning on something’.

‘He was perfect,’ Elayna said of Lennon (pictured)

‘At about 10pm, things began to speed up and so we began to prepare the home.’

However, it wasn’t to be – and still by 5pm the following day, the couple had no Lennon.

Despite wanting a home birth in water, ‘candles, fairy lights and essential oils burning in a diffuser’, Elayna and Riley knew they had to head to the hospital because they knew their baby ‘wasn’t going to come this way’.

‘With the TENS machine attached to my lower back, wires hanging off me, we locked up the house and grabbed our hospital bag,’ Elayna said.

Several difficult hours later, their baby was born. ‘He was perfect,’ she said.


Less than two weeks after the birth, Elayna confessed that the couple are ‘still very much getting used to parenthood’, but she added: ‘I’ve never felt so much love in my life’

‘Being a mum is the best job in the world,’ she added. ‘I’m still recovering physically from the event but I am so happy mentally with how everything turned out’

Less than two weeks after the birth, Elayna confessed that the couple are ‘still very much getting used to parenthood’, but she added: ‘I’ve never felt so much love in my life, my heart is just so full’.

‘Being a mum is the best job in the world,’ she added. ‘I’m still recovering physically from the event but I am so happy mentally with how everything turned out and I wouldn’t change a thing. 

‘I feel like I can do anything now. I can’t wait to head back to the boat, which is currently over in South Carolina patiently awaiting our return. We leave in a month’s time.’

The couple intend to raise Lennon on board as they continue to globetrot, supported by the financial aid of their YouTube followers. 

The couple intend to raise Lennon on board as they continue to globetrot, supported by the financial aid of their YouTube followers

Speaking to FEMAIL previously about their adventures and the less glamorous side to sailing around the world on a luxury yacht, Elayna and Riley said it’s not all plain sailing

Speaking to FEMAIL previously about their adventures and the less glamorous side to sailing around the world on a luxury yacht, Elayna and Riley said it’s not all plain sailing.

‘It’s nothing like what you see in the movies – calm waters, sunshine, champagne, smiles and spotless white clothing,’ Elayna laughed.

‘The reality of sailing the globe is sleepless nights, unexpected horrible weather, days when you question why you do it all in the first place, and there’s NEVER a clean white shirt to wear on board.

‘The first six months were the hardest,’ she added.

‘We were figuring out our roles on board, dividing up the chores and at the same time trying to love and take care of each other. But now, thankfully, the hardest part is well and truly over.’

‘The reality of sailing the globe is sleepless nights, unexpected horrible weather, days when you question why you do it all in the first place, and there’s NEVER a clean white shirt to wear on board,’ Elayna (pictured with Lenny) said

‘A wave had thrown Riley off his feet and on impact to his head he had pinched his nerve leading to his left arm,’ she explained.

‘I remember Riley’s entire arm went numb, like it had done when he had first broken his neck in Brazil many years ago. He lay on the floor for hours while we cried and discussed our options.

‘An emergency helicopter wouldn’t come as far off shore as we were, a container ship diverting course to pick him up would mean I would either have to sail the boat for weeks by myself to the Caribbean, or we’d have to abandon it.

‘And turning the boat around to sail against the wind to where we’d left from would be a rough trip and a big no no for a possible broken neck.

‘We decided to keep sailing downwards to our destination for another ten days, the entire time thinking that something in his neck holding his spine together may have come apart.

‘We didn’t know he was okay until Riley had his X-rays done in Antigua. It felt like a narrow escape.’


These days, Elayna said they are still making the bulk of their money on Patreon, a crowdfunding website, where family, friends and strangers can donate to their adventures

These days, Elayna said they are still making the bulk of their money on Patreon, a crowdfunding website, where family, friends and strangers can donate to their adventures.

‘We have over 2000 patrons now who each donate anywhere from $2 to $200 per video that we make,’ she said.

‘These people are the ones keeping us afloat, helping the videos to keep coming and helping us to grow and learn.

‘To be able to call what we do our full-time jobs really is a dream come true. We don’t plan to stop sailing any time soon. Riley and I both get itchy feet when we’re living on land. We love the feeling of freedom that comes with sailing.

‘We haven’t managed to circumnavigate the world yet, so that remains a goal for us both.’

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