Lee Stafford tells FEMAIL how to cut your own hair in lockdown

Lee Stafford tells FEMAIL how to cut your own hair in lockdown

March 6, 2021

How to cut your own hair: As salons stay closed for another six weeks, top hairdresser Lee Stafford tells FEMAIL how to avoid DIY disasters – including never using kitchen scissors

  • Hair and Beauty salons will reopen in April after nearly four months of closure 
  • Award-winning hairdresser Lee Stafford told FEMAIL how to cut hair at home
  • He advised how to chop longer locks as well as simple ways to cut shorter hair

With another six weeks until hair and beauty salons reopen, many people will be struggling with straggly ends and rough lockdown locks.  

Last week, Boris Johnson announced the road to getting out of lockdown, with hair and beauty salons in England set to reopen April 12th, which will mean many will have gone over four months without a hair cut, with most unsure of how to tackle their growing manes at home.

But there is a way to avoid disaster with a DIY trim. 

Speaking to FEMAIL, award winning hairdresser and the man behind his eponymous haircare brand Lee Stafford shared his top tips on how to trim split and damaged ends at home. 

Speaking to FEMAIL, award winning hairdresser and the man behind his eponymous haircare brand Lee Stafford shared his top tips on how to trim split and damaged ends at home

‘You will never achieve the results you would get from a salon when cutting your hair at home. 

‘However due to nearly four months of salon closures, it might be time for some people to cut off any wispy ends to prevent hair from becoming damaged and splitting further. 

‘Slow and steady does it when attempting to trim your own hair: follow my tips below to prevent any potential hair disasters,’ the Essex-born hairdresser added.  

Here, he tells FEMAIL the best way chop your own locks. 

HOW TO CUT LONG HAIR AT HOME 

Lee advises putting long hair in a ponytail before chopping it (stock image pictured)

Step one: Always start with smooth hair, especially those who are prone to frizz. It’s crucial your hair has its natural texture so curly girls stay away from the straighteners! 

As this is a dry cut, there is no need for washing beforehand.

Step two: Tip your head upside down, brush your hair forward and gather it into a tight, secure ponytail that starts right on your hairline in the centre of your forehead.

Step three: You now need to decide how long you want your first layer to be. 

With a comb, measure the distance from your hairline to where you want the layer to fall, this could either be just below the cheekbones or the bottom of your chin, or longer.

Step four: Pick up your ponytail and hold it firmly. Get your hairdressing scissors and then cut the hair in a straight line at the length you measured with a comb. If you’re concerned about chopping off too much, gently ease into the length. Remember, you can always cut more off but you can’t put back on!

Step five: Change your grip on the scissors and point them directly into the end of the ponytail and snip into the blunt ends. This will help give the hair a softer appearance, so continue until the ends are graduated, fluffy with no hard lines. Take care throughout this step as you don’t want to jab the scissors towards your eyes when you lean forward.

Step six: Pull off the hair band and shake your head so hair falls into place. Style as desired and voila… a DIY haircut at home! Don’t worry if only a little was cut off because it’s best to save the big chop for salon professionals

 

HOW TO CUT FOR SHORT HAIR 

For short hair, separate the hair into three even sections, running vertically from the hairline down

Step one: Same rule applies, start off with smooth, dry and natural textured hair. Separate the hair into three even sections, running vertically from the hairline down (a back, left and right section).

Step two: Tie the left and right section out the way and focus on the back section first. You will now need to judge how short you want to go… either a minor trim or cutting it to the nape of your neck for a short and chic bob.

Step three: Either use a mirror or a trustworthy family member and cut your hair horizontally half an inch longer than desired. You can always go back and cut off more or tidy up if necessary. Repeat this for the left and right sections, making sure it’s the same length as the back section.

Step four: Now it’s time to tidy. With your scissors facing up vertically, gently snip the ends to even out the cut. This will leave hair looking softer and less sharp. Shake your head, letting your hair fall naturally into place.

Step five: If you’re looking to add dimension to your bob cut, adding layers is a great way. Wherever you want the layers to fall, take one-inch sections, comb through and leave roughly one-inches from the bottom, in-between your fingers. Point the scissors down at an angle and start snipping down the hair shaft.

Step six: Shake your head again to let your hair fall into place and you’re finished!’

 

What to avoid when doing a home haircut: Never use kitchen scissors, invest in clips and avoid major restyling 

Award winning, celebrity stylist and Creative Director and Brand Ambassador for Imbue, Michelle Sultan gives her advice on how to trim curls at home whilst waiting for the salons to re-open.

Michelle says, ‘So we’re nearly there… but some of us missed the four week window when salons were open in November. 

‘If you missed the opportunity to see your favourite stylist for a trim before Christmas, then the thought of another couple of months of salon closure could be daunting. 

‘With the warmer weather approaching and the world opening up slowly we are no longer wanting to hibernate under heavy overgrown hair.

Of course, as a hairstylist I would never normally recommend cutting your hair yourself but if you really can’t wait another 8 weeks here’s how I can help.’

Michelle advises against trying any bold new styles and just doing simple trims at home

DON’T USE KITCHEN SCISSORS

 ‘Invest in the very best hairdressing scissors that you can afford, put down the kitchen scissors, these simply will not do,’ MIchelle said.

Lee agreed, adding: ‘The biggest mistake is to use kitchen scissors. Kitchen scissors are blunt so will most likely cause split ends and damage if used on the hair, so leave them in the drawer.’

‘Instead, you will need sectioning clips, a comb and hairdressing scissors (expect to pay £10-£25 online for an entry-level pair).

‘It’s important to cut on your natural texture…those with curly hair need to be careful because if curls are straightened and cut, the length will jump up as soon as it is curly again.’

KEEP IT SIMPLE      

‘Avoid trying to do a major hair make over, trust me it’s not as easy as most hairdressers make it look,’ she added. 

USE CLIPS TO SECTION HAIR

Michelle said: ”Section your hair using the clips you see hairdressers use, this will make your hair easier to control!

‘Section your hair using the clips you see hairdressers use, this will make your hair easier to control! 

‘Separate the areas that you want to concentrate on e.g. fringe areas are often the biggest offenders and often the bit that cause the most annoyance if grown out too much,’ she continued.

‘ If your hair is curly, I would recommend trimming curl by curl once the hair is dry and detangled, this is called a curly cut often performed by qualified “curly cutters”’ Michelle added

BE CAREFUL WITH CURLY HAIR 

If your hair is curly, I would recommend trimming curl by curl once the hair is dry and detangled, this is called a curly cut often performed by qualified “curly cutters”. 

‘Point cut the curl using the small tip of the scissors facing downwards, aiming to cut each cut at an angle so it’s not a straight line, it can be easy to do a tiny trim on curly hair which helps to rehydrate dry curls, but please only take a little off and save your ‘big chop’ for your stylist who will be able to reshape and balance. 

‘Look for ends that look frayed and only trim those tiny bits, you’ll know exactly where because the ends will be a different shape to the rest of the curl with majority of length,’ she added

TRIM WET IF YOUR HAIR IS STRAIGHT AND FINISH DRY

‘If your hair is mainly straight or you prefer to wear your hair straight then I recommend trimming a little whilst wet, and only take a very small amount off, remembering that even the straightest off hair can lose length when dry again. Again, avoid major restyles,’ she continued.    

Michelle added to get hair damp and trim, before letting it dry and making changes

Source: Read Full Article